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Nailing A Snig To A Fencepost

Started by: dostaf (inactive)

Anyone done it?

Other than this mon?

Started: 2nd Nov 2012 at 19:56

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Seems like a Hugh mistake to attempt to copy him, Dostaf. Have I hit the snail on the head?

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:01

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Almost

Would you care to remind us where snigs can be purchased, Jo Anne?

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:05

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Somewhere o'er yonder, Dostaf?

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:15

Posted by: bentlegs (4619)

At the Sniggery,

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:15

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

November explanation.

The other night when looking for Tanners and Mardents, I happened upon a few Cordwainers.

This, in turn, led me to start thinking about Cordwanglers.

I have been humming a tune for days.

This one

Then I remembered the Mester recently reminding Mac that people have had their moulies nailed to gateposts.

So when Hughe Fearnley-Whittingstal was mentioned on another thread, I was reminded of the snig incident.

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:16

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



Apparently, according to some research done by Jo Anne. Snigs can be bought at St Pat's club for a fiver.

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:17

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Balderdash and Piffle 18th Jun 2012 at 20:00

(The Archbishop is Rowan, not Robin, by the way )

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:19
Last edited by jo anne: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:21:19

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

And I quote:

Snig


Wigan term for a freshwater Eel found in the area in the canal, River Douglas or ponds. Occasionally eaten as a delicacy by some locals

'I went out carp fishing but all I got was snigs'

'I was in St Patricks Club and two lads tried to sell me a dead snig for a Fiver...'

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:19

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

wiki: A cordwainer (or cordovan) is a shoemaker/cobbler who makes fine soft leather shoes and other luxury footwear articles. The word is derived from "cordwain", or "cordovan", the leather produced in Córdoba, Spain.

The Honourable Cordwainers' Company:

The term "cordwainer" is an Anglicization of the French word cordonnier, which means shoemaker, introduced into the English language after the Norman invasion in 1066.

I think I might have put my foot in it.

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:41

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Soled and eeled.

Wait 'til Mache seees it.

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:42

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

I was going to say cordwainers work with 'eels and nails, Dostaf.

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:47

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Cobblers

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:47

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Cordwainers are not cobblers - to say that is a load of old cobbles.

A distinction preserved by cordwainers since the earliest times is, that a cordwainer works only with new leather, whereas a cobbler works with old. Cobblers have always been repairers, frequently prohibited by law from making shoes.

Though cobblers do work with 'eels and nails, too. Has Hugh ever cooked an Eel Cobbler?

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:52

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Much to my chagrin I can't tell you much about Hugh.

But he did nail a snig to a post in order to skin it.

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:54

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I was almost there.

Shagreen

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:58

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Now I know what a cordwangler is - dare he nail that to a post, I wonder?

(If the reference is rude, let me know. So rued I'll then edit.)

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 20:59
Last edited by jo anne: 2nd Nov 2012 at 21:00:03

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

You're causing more Mischief on General I see, Dostaf.

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 21:01

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Cordwangler, to me, is just one of Kenneth Williams' nonsense words used in his Rambling Sid ditties, Jo Anne.

Presumably a corruption of Cordwainer.

Suspect the mention in your link derives from KW's humour.

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 21:02

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

His expressions were wonderful - in both senses of the word.

Ask a silly question.

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 21:09

Posted by: tonker (23409) 

Have you ever had your nostrils stapled to a skirting board?

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 21:25

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

I know you've mentioned that on WW before, Tonker, but I can't remember so will ask - have you done it?

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 21:33

Posted by: tonker (23409) 

No, but I've had my shirt lap stapled to a chair!

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 21:42

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Glad to read it,Tonker - a torn shirt is no skin off your nose really, is it?

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 21:50

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Wiki - 'Shagreen is now commonly made of the skins of sharks and rays.'

Though 'Manta rays for shagreen' won't be Hugh's mantra:

'Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's love affair with the manta ray.'

'Everyone interested in wildlife dreams of an encounter with their hero animal. For me, obsessed with fish since I caught sticklebacks and kept them in a jam jar as a four-year-old, it's long been manta rays.'

Hugh goes on to wax lyrically about his diving encounter with them.

That is not to raise the hopes of the eel. Eels are not such a hit with Hugh.

I can't find a photo of when Hugh whacks clinically and nails a snig to a fence post, but, in not so many words, that neither wriggled out of it says it all. 

Replied: 2nd Nov 2012 at 22:39

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Does it hurt?



Not if you keep your thumb out of the way.



Snig was dead before he nailed it.

There is some stuff out there about skinning eels alive.

(I didn't bother to even look)

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 16:07

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

No, I didn't either, Dostaf, but I did gather other people use the same approach as Hugh did.

Sue's thread about snig made you cry.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 16:57

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



Still has the same effect.

I wonder if he ever nailed it to the table?

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 16:59

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Still has the same effect - according to the smilies it seems to have waned - only (4).

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 17:10

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I knew what was coming.

I didn't cry this time, to be honest.

But I still chuckled aloud.

I'd forgot that I mentioned Hugh's snig on that thread.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 17:15

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

I wonder if he ever nailed it to the table?

Snig served on a bed of nails? I'm sure someone would soon settle his hash.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 17:17

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



Me finger slipped, honest. (General)

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 17:19

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

I've seen your blame excuse, Dostaf.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 17:24

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Nowt wrong with repeats.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 17:25
Last edited by dostaf: 3rd Nov 2012 at 17:29:24

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 17:29

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

No comment.

I'm on me best behaviour.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 17:33

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

We shod all put our best foot forward - no high 'eels.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 17:57

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Looks like something yon cat's <<<<<<< been at.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 18:05

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

That's why I picked it.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 18:06

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I did wonder.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 18:13

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 21:07

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I'd expect that sort of thing from Mache, Jo Anne.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 21:13

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Mache could be the man to ask. Thanks, Dostaf.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 21:17
Last edited by jo anne: 3rd Nov 2012 at 21:18:59

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Had me scratching my head wehn I thought I'd clicked on same thread twice.

Anyone else, and I'd call them a notreet.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 21:18

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

^^^^^ Sorry, this mischief making is taking a lot of concentration.

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 21:20

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 3rd Nov 2012 at 21:26

 

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