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Tulip Or Dimple?

Started by: dostaf (inactive)

There you go, Jarvo.

Started: 17th Apr 2012 at 20:33

Posted by: mache (inactive)

you can spoon lobby out of a dimple

Replied: 17th Apr 2012 at 20:36

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I've just been looking at pics from Amsterdam.

And Kirk Douglas

Replied: 17th Apr 2012 at 20:38

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Tulip was also a character in Porridge. (Christmas Special)

Replied: 17th Apr 2012 at 20:40

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Stagnation O't brain

Replied: 17th Apr 2012 at 20:40

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 17th Apr 2012 at 20:47

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 17th Apr 2012 at 21:01

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 18:21

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

There's a coincidence.

Time for an April explanation.

GLASSES.

Tulip

Dimple

Mackeson

Mac's

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 18:39

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Ah! GLASSES! All becomes clear!

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:04

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

So genteel.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:06

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

I think I've got the wrong glasses as I can't see what you mean? Genteel?

Chin-chin!

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:11

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

gen·teel (jn-tl)

adj.

1. Refined in manner; well-bred and polite.
2. Free from vulgarity or rudeness.
3. Elegantly stylish: genteel manners and appearance.
4.
a. Striving to convey a manner or appearance of refinement and respectability. See Synonyms at polite.
b. Marked by affected and somewhat prudish refinement.



Unless, of course, you sup from pint pots, Jo Anne.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:14

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Rick Stein -> Stein
n. A mug, especially one for beer, usually holding about a pint.

James Galway -> Flute 3. A tall narrow wineglass, often used for champagne.



I rarely sup at all.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:20

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Jarvo wrote:

Posted by: jarvo (14147)

I wanted to spice things up...

It's getting too political and serious on here.

Drinking thread, anybody...?


Replied: 17th Apr 2012 at 20:30


Here

I meant to put this thread on 'General'.

I may start a controversial one:

'Should birds sup from pint pots?'

How long would that last?

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:26

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Birds drinking pints isn't so common a sight these days, is it?

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:32

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

There was something about that on telly the other week. Learned behaviour, which has now probably become 'unlearned'.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:34

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Did you guess before you pressed? (If so, my pint plot was foiled.)

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:38

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Of course I guessed. Bluetits came immediately to mind.

What am I, sexist or somethiing?

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:42

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:44

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



I didn't really guess. I just pressed.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:46

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

^^Did you guess before you pressed that time?

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:46

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

No.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:53

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Cheers, (this time) Dostaf.

I was nearly tempted to wave!

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 19:59

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Nooooooooooooooooooooo

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 20:02

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

However, by the 1950s the entire UK blue tit population had learnt how to pierce the bottle tops to reach the cream, whereas the robins never did. Occasionally an individual robin learnt how to pierce the milk bottle seal but the skill never spread to the whole population as it did with blue tits.

Here

So them there robins aren't reliant after all.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 20:53

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

robins aren't reliant

At least robins aren't all robbers! (They might not want to do bird.)

4. Slang prison or a term in prison (esp in the phrase do bird; shortened from birdlime, rhyming slang for time)

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 21:21

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Who'd have thought it?

If asked, I'd have said birdlime was something used by pigeon fanciers.

Page 3 'The Planning Decision'

Though I do think I've read before about catching birds that way. Possibly to do with either in order to kill then stuff them for display, or to kill them for their feathers for ladies' hats. Victorian 'art' and fashion.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 21:53
Last edited by dostaf: 18th Apr 2012 at 21:55:17

Posted by: mache (inactive)

The suzuki swift should be with us soon

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 21:55

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

A swift half?

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 21:56

Posted by: mache (inactive)

there is a hilman hawk for sale in preston and i've seen a riley kestral in wigan

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 21:58

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Stick to topic (and it's kestrEl)

That stuff was gnat's

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:04

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Why gnat's pee?

Where did that come from?

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:05

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Pigeon Fanciers - 'The loft shall at all times be kept clean and the interior shall be lime-washed twice a year.'

I delight in seeing birds out and about - some goldfinches in our garden today brightened up the day.

(I couldn't remember what they were called - the RSPB came to the rescue.)

Sticking to topic.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:07
Last edited by jo anne: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:13:36

Posted by: mache (inactive)

how oddie, but I only sup ale

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:08

Posted by: mache (inactive)

gnats are on the boddington label

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:09
Last edited by mache: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:10:58

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

"I delight in seeing birds out and about."

I know the feeling.

Oddie's on Springwatch.

That stuff tasted like badger pee too. Not that I've tasted badger pee. The ale was bad enough.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:13
Last edited by dostaf: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:14:35

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:16

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Mac likes a bishops finger

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:18
Last edited by mache: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:19:48

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:22

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:23

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

(Springwatch: Did you see a badger sett on a TV set whilst settled on a settee?)

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:24

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



Aye, and you have to mind your bum on the dodgy springs.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:26

Posted by: mache (inactive)

some decent ale in new springs

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:28

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Old Springs

At some locals you can have a bit of a natter and a pint of Gnats.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:33
Last edited by jo anne: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:33:53

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:37

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Who's that, Mache?!

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:39

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Dickie Bird the umpire

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:41

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

I thought it was, but wasn't quite sure.

From gnats to bats.

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:44

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Replied: 18th Apr 2012 at 22:46

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

It's Dickie Bird's birthday, today, if wiki isn't mistaken.

Seen here wearing glasses.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 09:30

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



I missed a trick Yesterday at 22:04

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 14:25

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Did you see where wiki was mistaken?

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 14:37

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Gizza clue.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 14:48

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

What is the title of the sequel to Dickie's autobiography, according to wiki?

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 14:53

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



I too misread the title on the Amazon pic.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 14:55

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 



I read the wiki article first, and found the book title quite amusing. I discovered it wasn't right when I saw the Amazon pic.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:00

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Dickie is well known for having deep pockets and short arms. Even by Yorkshire standards.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:06

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

April explanation, please! (I'm not too proud to ask.)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:08

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

'John Smith's – The Home of No Nonsense' (web site)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:10
Last edited by jo anne: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:10:39

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Dickie is reputably tight fisted.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:12

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Yes, but what's John Smith's got to do with it?!

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:14

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Yorkshre bitter.

Often served in pint glasses. The majority of which are tulips. Hence the pic. (See thread title)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:17

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Or Tyke-l as some might pronounce it.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:20

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



Them buggers don't like pronouncing their t's.

Often heard in Emmerdale.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:24

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Dimple?

Or Nay.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:28

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

I think they pronounce some t's as glottal stops.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:30

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Have they no clacks?

There's a good supping term.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:33

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

April explanation

Term used to describe someone who can pour it down their neck with ease.

'He's getten no clack'

Or to avoid complaints of sexism:

'She's getten no clack'

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:39
Last edited by dostaf: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:40:27

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

See here, too. 19th April(!) 2010 at 17:43

Sexism, again! Also see 19th April 2010 at 15:05.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:44
Last edited by jo anne: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:46:29

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



What a spooky coincidence.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 15:54

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Spooky, indeed!

Guess before you press.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:00

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:03

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

And why not? It's on topic.

(And sometimes having a bit of Dutch courage might help in WW!)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:18

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:21

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Are you brave enough?

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:25

Posted by: mache (inactive)

I can push a 1/2 dimple through a 1 pint dimple handle

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:37

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I can push anything you want through one.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:39

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Even a rose

Copperfield couldn't find a tulip.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:41

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:44

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

A pansy?

Whatever can he mean?

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:46

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:51

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:55

Posted by: mache (inactive)

cinders me earth straps loose

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:57

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

It's a glass welly. German to boot.

Like a yard of ale, there's an art to supping out of them. If you don't rotate it right as you drink, there's a sudden inrush of air to the toe and you get a facefull.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 16:59

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:01

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:04

Posted by: jo anne (33520) 

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:06

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:07

Posted by: mache (inactive)

are you connected to -ve earth

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:10

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I'm well grounded.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:11

Posted by: mache (inactive)

early pre dimple glasses were the same without dimples, the dimples were put in to save glass

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:14

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Really?

Most interesting. The dimpled ones are heavy enough as it is.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:16

Posted by: mache (inactive)

saw some in a camra mag years ago with explanation

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:18

Posted by: mache (inactive)

the pre tulip glasses were bulbs

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:20

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I've been to the St Helens glass museum a few times, but can't recall anything about glasses.

I know glass blowers supped ale to counteract the nasty sulphurous gasses they encountered. Beer was the only thing that did the trick.

And it was thirsty work.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:21

Posted by: mache (inactive)

probabally not mass produced then as tankards were the norm

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:29

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:34

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:48

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Gerroff.

Folk will think you are proposing a toast.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:52

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 17:56

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

There's a lovely description of a Toastmaster by Rangi Ram in It Aint Half Hot Mum.

'Big shouty man' or something like that.

Replied: 19th Apr 2012 at 18:01

 

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