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Not A Handbag.

Started by: joseph 1 (inactive)

But a purse.

HERE

Started: 24th Jan 2012 at 21:39

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Replied: 24th Jan 2012 at 21:44

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)




Mester; what was the name of the private company in Common As Muck?

Was it Prospre or something similar? Possibly Belgian.

Resisting trawling through clips, but it's been bugging me.

Replied: 24th Jan 2012 at 21:47
Last edited by dostaf: 24th Jan 2012 at 21:50:10

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

It was something like that, Douglas Henshall off that primeval show was the head of the new company.

Replied: 24th Jan 2012 at 22:26

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)


Brian Forget!

Replied: 24th Jan 2012 at 22:34

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Excellent...

Reminded me of the time the Lady walking ahead of me sped up so I did too, she began running so I ran too, she screamed so I screamed as well. I never even saw what we were running from.

Is a large purse a Handbag?

Replied: 25th Jan 2012 at 08:24

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Lovely find, mester. (Propre)

I wasn't far off. (But not near enough)

Really got absorbed in the HB clips. Love the 'Pychiatrist' episode.

Oh; apologies for the tandem. I wouldn't usually cause such a distraction. Am a good lad I am.

Replied: 25th Jan 2012 at 14:47

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

I don't think I have ever seen or heard of a funnier woman than Hilda. A great clip of her clog dancing is on there too.

Replied: 25th Jan 2012 at 15:09

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Yes, I saw that.

Do you know, I found myself wondering if they were using another person for the close-ups of the dancing clogs.

I wondered to myself if modern talentless acts had caused me to be so cynical.

Replied: 25th Jan 2012 at 15:16

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Variety background, mester, she would have had to know a bit of everything. But I know what you mean, and that's sad.

Replied: 25th Jan 2012 at 15:21

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

True. I knew straight away it wouldn't be a double. Sad that the thought occurred.

Similarly, M&W were experienced hoofers.

Replied: 25th Jan 2012 at 15:28

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

Not a handbag. But a purse.



A purse is a handbag in America, not Wigan.

Replied: 25th Jan 2012 at 16:35

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



Gerrim telt.

Replied: 25th Jan 2012 at 18:43

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Mester:

Hancock 'The Tycoon'


RIVAL GREEK TYCOON:In my country we have a saying: "He who hunts the tiger must expect to be eaten."

HANCOCK:In our country we also have a saying: "He who annoys the elephant must expect a tusk up the bracket!"

Replied: 25th Jan 2012 at 20:13

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Do you know I spotted that when I was looking up the "Bracket" question, mester. By then though the moment had past so I didn't bother.

Replied: 25th Jan 2012 at 21:18

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Oooohhhh, get her.

I actually heard it very recently, then googled.

A tusk up the throat? A tusk up the jaw?

Sounds like a lower target to me.

Replied: 26th Jan 2012 at 14:09

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Alf Hall

Danny Ross doing the quickest fall and recovery known to man, pure magic and talent.

Replied: 27th Jan 2012 at 13:46

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

HAHAHAHAHA!!!!

Replied: 27th Jan 2012 at 14:42

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Is he quick or what!

Replied: 27th Jan 2012 at 15:01

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Blink and miss it.

Replied: 27th Jan 2012 at 17:24

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 27th Jan 2012 at 18:07

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

It's my favourite clip and Danny was also a favourite too, in those films and with Jimmy Clitheroe.

Sorry for the late replies in posts, av not geet time't fart these days.

Replied: 28th Jan 2012 at 00:11

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Do it in a bottle, then you can appreciate it later.

Replied: 28th Jan 2012 at 16:17

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

There was something on telly the other week (possibly QI) about saving such gas being recommended as a way of warding off the plague, or something similar.

It was QI

Fry said Methane was not the gas that was ignited.

Replied: 28th Jan 2012 at 16:37

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

That is a better clip than where lee evans deflates, then pumps himself back up.

Replied: 28th Jan 2012 at 18:09
Last edited by Mac: 28th Jan 2012 at 20:46:24

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Les Dawson did a similar thing.

Replied: 28th Jan 2012 at 18:16

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

I haven't seen Les's version, sadly.

Replied: 28th Jan 2012 at 20:46

Posted by: kenee (2097)

I have a vague recollection of Milligan doing something on those lines. Then again, I could be confusing him with Peter Sellars blowing up his parrot.

A punch up the bracket?
Where did that originate?
I thought it was The Army Game.
Which came first, Hancock or Army Game?

Replied: 2nd Feb 2012 at 19:28

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Hancock 1955

Army Game 1957

Replied: 2nd Feb 2012 at 20:02

Posted by: kenee (2097)


Hancock it is then.

I think Alfie Bass continued the saying in Bootsie & Snudge.

Replied: 3rd Feb 2012 at 16:26

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

It must have been in regular parlance somewhere.

Had G&S 'invented' the term, I think we'd have heard more about it.

See 'scrote' and 'naff'. Both claimed to have been coined by Porridge writers Dick Clement and Ian LeFrenais.

Replied: 3rd Feb 2012 at 16:31

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

I think you will find "Naff" coming from the polari, mester, used by some folk who's practice took up most of their time in the 1960's.

Replied: 4th Feb 2012 at 14:07

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Unless Clement and LeFrenais are a couple of omi polones.

Replied: 4th Feb 2012 at 14:17

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Of course.

I'm mistaking the fact that they claimed to have brought it into modern parlance.

On the thing I saw, Princess Anne was mentioned. She made the front pages for saying 'Naff Off' to someone.

Possibly the 'Britain's best Comedy' competition. Johnny Vaughan (ex lag) presented the case for 'Porridge'

I've often wondered about G&S

Replied: 4th Feb 2012 at 17:28
Last edited by dostaf: 4th Feb 2012 at 17:30:27

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Hmmm, best to keep your hand in dearie!

Replied: 4th Feb 2012 at 17:49

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Oooooh, get her.

Replied: 4th Feb 2012 at 17:50

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

Are G&S Gilbert & Sullivan?

Replied: 4th Feb 2012 at 17:51

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Is that a euphamism, Jo Anne?

Galton and Simpson. They wrote for Hancock and created Steptoe and Son.

Replied: 4th Feb 2012 at 17:56

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Sarn't Major Claude Snudge and Private Montague 'Excused Boots' Bisley.

Replied: 4th Feb 2012 at 17:56

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

Not a euphamism, Dostaf. (I wouldn't know a euphamism if I fell over it.)

G&S - Galton and Simpson

Gilbert & Sullivan Only goes to show, 'If you don't ask ... you don't guess!'

Replied: 4th Feb 2012 at 18:08

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



Interesting read

Ater Hancock, they decided not to use comedians and decided to rely on actors. they said that actors followed a script and let the writers sort out the funny stuff. Or words to that effect.

Harry H Corbett was had great potenital as an actor, but was sadly typecast as Harold Steptoe.

Replied: 4th Feb 2012 at 18:11

Posted by: veg grower (inactive)

Indeed dostaf - HHC was a classically trained actor, he had very fine tastes, was a lover/collector of fine art, dressed very stylishly and hated the fact that he had become typecast.

Replied: 5th Feb 2012 at 05:39

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

His father also collected fine pieces of art too, mostly under his homberg and at funerals.

18:45

Replied: 5th Feb 2012 at 14:03
Last edited by joseph 1: 5th Feb 2012 at 14:08:09

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Homburg mester? Hombburg?

You're confuisng Albert with the lad from Cheam, he with the asrakhan collar.

Google tells me humburgs feature a 'gutter crown'.

Replied: 5th Feb 2012 at 15:40

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

He's wearing a bowler for the funeral, silly me.

Replied: 5th Feb 2012 at 15:56

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

G&S makes me think of Andréas Voutsinas, a Greek actor and theater director. Although, of course, In the English-speaking world, he was best known for his roles in three Mel Brooks films, The Producers (1968), The Twelve Chairs (1970) and History of the World, Part I (1980).

Replied: 5th Feb 2012 at 15:59

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Oh! Cheating, but sticking to your word is it, Jo anne?

I was about to put a February explanation on the other thead, but don't need to now.

Replied: 5th Feb 2012 at 16:03

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 19:54
Last edited by joseph 1: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:05:12

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

BINGO!

I knew I'd recently seen something with a play on the word 'certificate' recently.

Was scratching my head about it when I read Jarvs DVLA thread.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:12

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Looking back at those old clips fills me full of neuralgia.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:15

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Who needs Kreskin!

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:17

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

If they get on your nerves, don't watch 'em, Joseph.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:17

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:19

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

By the way, mester, Ken Parry was another I met on a few occasions in the Belle Green Pub. He would come home to Ince to visit his family that still lived there. I had forgot all about Ken until that clip.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:21

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I was on about him recently, mester.

A thread turned into a 'Spring And Port Wine' quiz.

Infamy! Infamy!

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:25

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Didn't he play the pawn shop chap or similar?

I remember there was always a bit of tension with Ken and his family after a few rounds of drinks, which he paid for everytime.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:29

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

"If they get on your nerves, don't watch 'em, Joseph. "
Very good, Jo Anne.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:31

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Yes mester. He was the Pawnbroker who they took the dad's overcoat to.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:33

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

Thanks, Joseph.

Dostaf's thread turned into a 'Spring And Port Wine' quiz.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:34

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

That's right, mester, I remember now. Thanks for the link Jo Anne.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:36

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I just found it and was about to link the ruined thread, Jo Anne.

I'd forgot that it was one of mine.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:36

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

They are easily forgot, mester!

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:37

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Cheeky sod.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:38

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

Joseph -

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:39

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

All done in the best possible taste!

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:39

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Muck sticks, you know.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:47

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

It's a good job 'he' doesn't know how to fling thwaaarts!

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:52

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



Aye, especially in our faces.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 20:58

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

Is it best to be thick-skinned? A mudpack doesn't do this pachyderm any harm.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 21:15

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 21:24

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

"Thw***rt away if it makes thee happy."

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 21:57

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Why the asterisks?

Nowt wrong with the odd thwaaart, Jo Anne.

Number of a's used denotes strength of thwaaart.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 22:05

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 22:09

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Not again.

I was just about to paste this:


Posted by: jo anne (11450)

You two wigan world gentlemen are certainly getting all this Thwaaarting down to a fine aaart!
Replied: 1st Nov 2008 at 16:37


Then type

Mester; er's gone all posh on us.

From here

That XRH linked to a smutty clip.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 22:13
Last edited by dostaf: 23rd Feb 2012 at 22:19:28

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

That was in the day when I'd risk it - now I just asterisk it.

Mache's letter "a" is missing.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 22:23

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

If he uses both hands he'll manage to find his 'a'.

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 22:25

Posted by: jo anne (33497) 

If he uses both hands he can find it single-handedly?

Replied: 23rd Feb 2012 at 22:36

 

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