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The Green Book

Started by: dostaf (inactive)

What terms to suggest someone is a dafty are permissible?

Seriously, the word cretin, is a truly offensive term as it relates to a medical condition.

What would be classed as 'safe' on here?

Notreet

Wazzock

Crackpot


Over to the PC brigade.

Started: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:17
Last edited by dostaf: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:20:28

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Banjo twanger

Can we say/type banjo twanger, bowt causing bother?

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:19

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Dafty will do for me.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:19

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Wa.... No best not.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:19

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Medical condition you type?...Best seek a specialists advice. Maybe get a FREE CAR out of it!...Hmmm.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:19

Posted by: franky (268)

A slate missing
Tapped
One short of a six pack
Radio Rental
Three sheets to the wind
came over on the onion boat
Daft as a brush
Thick as pig s#@t

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:21

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Onion boat?

There's been a discussion about that before, Franky.

Google time.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:23

Posted by: erontquay (inactive)

As you well know dostaf my favorite is Wazzock

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:24

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Here

No wonder I remembered it.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:25

Posted by: franky (268)

I think the onion boats came from Ireland dostaf

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:25

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

See my link above, Franky. ^^^^^

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:27

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

Dimmer than a Toc H lamp.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:30

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I heard Roy Walker on the radio the other day, doing something about the 40th anniversary of The Comedians.

Interviewer asked about the aparrent racism in the jokes, particularly the Irish ones.

Roy explained that at the time that was the norm, but people, including himself, went on to change the slant so as not to be, or appear to be racist.

In his case, he said he introduced his thick brother-in-law character who he named Hugh.

Laterly to become known as Shughie.

I just thought at the time that Shughie was just another Irish mon, like Pat and Mick.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:36
Last edited by dostaf: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:37:58

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

I know a Shuggie, or used to do.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:41

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Not posted for a goodly, Or has he?

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:44

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Different pronunciation, Mester.

Roys mon was pronounced Shoe-ie.

Them Jock Shuggies rhyme with huggies.

Can you get tartan nappies?

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:44

Posted by: tomplum (8260) 

thick as black smoke,
If that mon was any thicker, he'd set
sandwich short of a picnic
leets on but there's nobody wom
bungalow (nowt upstairs)

banjo twanger might offend our resident banjo picker, granada, who picks banjer with billy and the temprermentals

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:50

Posted by: joseph 1 (inactive)

"Can you get tartan nappies?"

Away 'n' raffle yersel!

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:52

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

'thick as black smoke'

Can he say/type that in these turbulent PC times?

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 16:52

Posted by: section 8 (2875) 

All those you listed are racist, and discriminatory.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:17

Posted by: lapis lazuli (inactive)

Thick as a Gurkhas foreskin.

Thick as a dockers wallet.

Thick as a dockers butty.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:20

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Dolt

Dullard

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:22

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Cletus!

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:34

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I'll race you to it.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:35

Posted by: veg grower (inactive)

PMSL

Particularly at Franky and Lapiz.

Slack-jawed is another. As in Cletus The Slack Jawed Yokel off the Simpson's.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:47
Last edited by veg grower: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:48:41

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

That was my cletus reference, VG.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:48

Posted by: veg grower (inactive)

I thought it might be Mac.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:49

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

No, not Mac. The chap off the Simpsons.

Mac's a racist thug, but not slack jawed.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:50

Posted by: Mac (inactive)



What's wrong with the good old fashioned Imbecile?...
(Be along shortly, I suspect).

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:50

Posted by: veg grower (inactive)



You both knew what I meant.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:50

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Imbecile is a medical term.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:51

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Yep (Yup-Yip)

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:52

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Gordon Is A Moron. (Song by John Shuttleworth )

Would that be allowed today?

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:54

Posted by: veg grower (inactive)

I daresay the current Government would sanction it as ok.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:57

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I'm begining to wonder if we are about to see, or are seeing a sort of exchange between aceptable terms.

Anatomical references would once have been taboo, whereas medical insults were the norm.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 17:59

Posted by: veg grower (inactive)

I'm not falling for that.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 18:01

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I'm being serious.

At one time you'd hear people being called things linked directly to illness, but any reference to a dangly bit would be classed as outrageous.

Now it appears vise versa.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 18:06

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I had hoped for a guest speaker/typer.

But hey ho!

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 18:38

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Here's a coincidence:

Jonathan Dimbleby, a fellow presenter, described Mr Schofield’s behaviour as “cretinous”.

Here

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 19:58

Posted by: veg grower (inactive)

I agree wholeheartedly with Dimbleby's comments.

Schofield's stunt was for max effect and to further his own ends.

Cameron was equally wrong however, as regards his comments about being witch-hunted for being gay.

The abuse that took place in the Children's Care Homes in Wales is nothing to do with homosexuality - it is sickening paedophilia plain and simple and there needs to be a full and further inquiry.


Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 20:04

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 20:08

Posted by: fossil (7005)

Backward you lot!

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 20:17

Posted by: veg grower (inactive)

I knew what it meant.

Perhaps more respected broadcasters are allowed to get away with such things.

If Schofield had called anyone's actions cretinous - I doubt he would have got away with it.

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 20:17

Posted by: 1934granada (inactive)

"Banjo twanger"

"Can we say/type banjo twanger, bowt causing bother"?
Is that comment aimed at me dostaf?

Thanks tomplumb

Replied: 8th Nov 2012 at 23:15
Last edited by 1934granada: 8th Nov 2012 at 23:18:20

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

No, Granada. If you click the link included in that post, you'll see it was a reference to a film.

Replied: 9th Nov 2012 at 13:28

Posted by: 1934granada (inactive)

I know that dostaf. I clicked the link prior to replying to your post What I can't understand is why would you think/ saying/typing banjo twanger would cause bother
I'm not offended

Replied: 9th Nov 2012 at 22:39

Posted by: gasmon (70)

My dad used to say "yon mon's as thick as a Tockhole's butty"

Tockholes being a small village somewhere beyond Chorley.

Where this saying originated I dont know.

Gas

Replied: 9th Nov 2012 at 22:49

Posted by: section 8 (2875) 

Similarly my father would say "Tharrers thick as a green bank butty". Not to me of course.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 01:12

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Granada:

I'm trying hard to do an impression (in writing) of what you/we are all familiar with.

Bear with me.

You know the situation when somebody points and nods at someone (usually out of earshot, or behind their back), then does a strumming mime, acompanied with a wink, and 'says'

♪♫♪♫♪"Dinky dink, dink-dink"♪♫♪♫♪ ?

Well, that's saying someone is a 'banjo twanger'.

Suggesting that they are not all there.

I should copyright that description.

If anyone else can write it beter, please do.


PS I don't really know if that lad in 'Southern Comfort' was all there, or not.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 02:22
Last edited by dostaf: 10th Nov 2012 at 02:40:18

Posted by: Oganeil (130)

when I worked at Walmsleys, me and a lad were known as Daftyed and Blownum. Never figured out who was which though.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 06:35

Posted by: PeterP (9039)

Thick has two short planks
numpty
text book engineer
gaga

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 09:00

Posted by: kathpressey (5392) 

puddlt

crateggs

daft as a brush

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 09:28

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

I like being as daft as a brush on WW, Kathp - me on my pc - it helps keep me sane.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 09:39

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

But, Kath, where does 'puddlt' come from?

I've been thinking more about my description of making a banjo noise to imply someone is not a full shilling. As I mentioned, usually behind their back as it were and mainly in a light-hearted manner.

Here's a thing; whats the reason behind doing a winding motion with the index finger at the side of the head to imply the same?

Does it relate to trepanning. where holes were made in the skull?

I think in some countries they use a fly-catching gesture to imply the same.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 16:01

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Does it relate to people being termed round the bend/twist - possible origins?

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 16:15

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Took a bit of googliing.

Tried 'loose screw gesture' and found this:

Cuckoo sign, touched or screw loose. In North America, making a circling motion of the index finger at the ear or side of the head signifies that the person "has a screw loose," i.e. is speaking nonsense or is crazy]

WIKI not linked, as page contains rude words.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 16:16

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Asylum v asylum

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 16:19

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Nice find, Jo Anne.

I hope the rope doings on the Spring View and Standish welcome signs have no siimilar ropey connotations.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 16:25

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Tapped

That's another. I wonder if that relates to trepanning.

If so, tapped would suggest a release of fluid or pressure, thus meaning the person would have returned to normal.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 16:32

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

I know this is a light-hearted thread, Dostaf, but anyhow ... a serious question:

Anti-stigma Campaigns - Are they working?

'The Institute of Psychiatry is carrying out regular surveys of people with mental health problems to find out if Time to Change is having an effect on their lives. The team is also monitoring and analysing the way mental illness is portrayed in the media.'

www.time-to-change.org.uk

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 16:44
Last edited by jo anne: 10th Nov 2012 at 16:52:03

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I've been trying to find info about the imaginary fly thing, Jo Anne.

Not a lot doing, except issues with dogs.

On reading your link, I'm glad the gesture, even if done in a light-hearted way is not prominent in our culture.

People who have experienced psychosis may also feel discriminated against because of mental health law, which allows compulsory treatment. Side effects of antipsychotic medication – such as involuntary movements – may also make them feel set apart and seen as ‘different’.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 16:51
Last edited by dostaf: 10th Nov 2012 at 16:57:48

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

The Joey Deacon thing has just come to mind.

Way back when, in an attemt to educate the young people, Blue Peter featured a disabled man called Joey Deacon.

This, unfortunately led to a new term of abuse entering the vocabulary.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 17:14

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Blue Peter and cultural impact

In 1981, the last year of his life, Joey Deacon was featured on the children's magazine programme Blue Peter for the International Year of the Disabled. He was presented as an example of a man who achieved a lot in spite of his disabilities. Despite the sensitive way in which Blue Peter covered his life, the impact was not as intended. The sights and sounds of Deacon's distinctive speech and movements had a lasting impact on young viewers, who quickly learnt to imitate them. His name and mannerisms quickly became a label of ridicule in school playgrounds across the country


Wiki

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 17:16

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Thanks, Dostaf - I wasn't aware of that. Children, indeed people, can be cruel and some aspects of campaigns can prove to be counterproductive.

However, I think many issues surrounding mental health are still misunderstood and sometimes regarded as a taboo subject and campaigns might help to address this problem.

'1 in 4 people will experience a mental health problem in any given year.

Often the fact that it’s difficult to talk about mental health problems can be one of the hardest parts of having a mental illness. It can lead to the loss of friendships, feeling isolated, not seeking help and slower recovery. 
'

I agree with the points you highlighted in purple 16:51 - those concerns may be arguably necessary evils at present. Hopefully good advances will be made in the field of mental health - it still seems to be in its infancy to me.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 17:38

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I've frequently heard comments from people wishing they could swap their particular problems for ones more visible and easier to understand and sympathise with. eg a leg in plaster.

I think the humourous side of things can be a double edged sword.

Putting a brave face on things? Trying to laugh it off? Avoidance?

On the other hand; there's also a posssibility that being over sensitive to 'harmless' comments/descriptions could have a negative effect.

In the sense that getting too PC about it could do more harm than good.

A fine line.

There was a great TV campaign a while back featuring a bloke who had returned to work following a bout of illness. The emphasis was advising folk not to fear treading on eggshells, but to just accept the person.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 17:53

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

I do remember those adverts, Dostaf.

I think they may be featured on the www.time-to-change.org.uk website. Youtube

There's lots of information on the site.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 18:13
Last edited by jo anne: 10th Nov 2012 at 18:25:38

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

That's the one, Jo Anne. (Youtube)

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 18:25

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Now, back to topic - soft melt!

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 18:31

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 18:32

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 18:36

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



I once described a young un with mental health problems as a daft sod/git (to his face) in fun.

For a moment my heart stopped and I thought "What have I just done?"

Then I realised:

I'd treated him the same as I would anyone else I was having a bit of banter with.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 18:43

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

It's probably better to be insulted in jest than feel people are trying to tread on egg shells around you.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 18:53

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I'm struggling with Crate Egg (as mentioned by Kath).

One I'm well familiar with.

Best I can find is that reliable source Jo Anne uses from time to time.


Crate Egg



Old fashioned Barnsley/general yorkshire term for (Comment removed because it broke the rules). more often used whilst driving...

"gerront right side ut rowd yer crate egg"
*taps temple with forefinger in angry fashion in rearview mirror for 'crate egg' to see*

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 18:57

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Barm pot!

(I like that one as one of my secondary school teachers used to use it and he was a brilliant character.)

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:03

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Never mind that: what's a crate egg?

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:06

Posted by: bentlegs (4737)

He/ Her , is as daft as a Gas mons mac.or a Werriton Bobby,

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:09

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Never mind that - perhaps egg crates may be more useful to you, Dostaf - for practising insults without people thinking you're cracking up.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:10

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

There's controversial

I thought it was 'as far as a Gasmon's mac'.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:11

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Not heard those, Bentlegs. Not familiar with many of these sayings in fact. Sorry, Dostaf - I shouldn't egg you on.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:13

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)


Posted by: mollie m (5957)

There's a saying: "thar'as fow as a gasmon's mac" when referring to someone not very good looking!

Here

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:14

Posted by: bentlegs (4737)

Well dostaf, its a long time since i heard my mother come out with it,so you could be reet,

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:14

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Who knows.

I wonder how widespread such terms are, Bentlegs.

I'm sure a Wigan one is 'eggwapp'.

I often think of this when reading correspondence on here from t'other side of Bickershaw.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:19

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:36

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

And if he's all theer, I don't want to be.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:38

Posted by: mache (inactive)

this thread needs merging with the next thread down

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:42

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Notreet!

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:44

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Go on, I know I shouldn't, but:

Which thread would that have been at the time of typing, Mache?

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:45

Posted by: mache (inactive)

bus mon the doctor's on

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:47

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

That's even on a different board you daft sod!

'Politics'

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:48

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

"When dealing with the insane, the best method is to pretend to be sane.” ― Hermann Hesse

That and some other good quips - here.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:49

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:49

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Which reminds me is it barmey or barmet

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:49

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

So joining the party was judged not to be a busmon's folly-day?

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:51

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

“There is, incidentally, no way of talking about cats that enables one to come off as a sane person.”
― Dan Greenberg

Take note, Mache.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:53

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

What about listening to talking dogs? Barmey/barmet

Am I barking mad?

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:56

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Talking about cats the bugger nearly dropped a mouse in me beer last night

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:56

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Build it and they will come.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 19:58

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Incidentally; the thread beneath this at the time of Mache's 19:42 was the Bill Tarmey one.

Confession time.

A phrase sometimes used on here by yours truly, was actually one of Jack Duckworth's.


'Every egg a bird'

Or, in other words, a prize every time.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:01

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Duck egg?

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:03

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I'm trying to remember what he was actually selling at the time (possibly twenty years ago), may have been raffle tickets in the Rovers.

I'm not really a fan of soaps, but did notice and remember the phrase.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:08

Posted by: mache (inactive)

It was a meat draw for a swamp duck

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:10

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

You don't seem to be a fan of soft soaping either, Dostaf.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:10

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Believe it or not, Jo Anne. I'm one of those who actually do suffer fools.

But not always gladly.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:12

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Then more fool you, Dostaf.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:37

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I'm one of those people who often incredulously look skyward and ask:

"Why me? Is there a flashing sign on me yed which attracts them?"

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:47

Posted by: mache (inactive)

Do you point at the aeroplanes whilst looking skyward

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:49

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

We've discussed this before, Dostaf - 'Birds of a feather ...

It's possibly the fine line between suffering and encouraging

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:49
Last edited by jo anne: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:50:07

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

See what I mean? ^^^^^^^

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:50

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

'Do you point at the aeroplanes whilst looking skyward'

"Aviation is the highest form of flattery."

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 20:54

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Animation is better.

Would the Looney Tunes brand be accepted, if new, today?

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 21:05

Posted by: 1934granada (inactive)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cguXYfVuSg

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 23:29

Posted by: 1934granada (inactive)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UtqwL-ZPhAA

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 23:48

Posted by: tonker (24587) 

I once had a pink marblette notebook!

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 23:53

Posted by: 1934granada (inactive)

Any chance of a couple of links Tonker? Cheers.

Replied: 10th Nov 2012 at 23:55

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

Plane Crazy - Mickey Mouse 1928 Both Mickey and Minnie are aerobatties.

(Considered sat-higher satire?
"Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own" - Jonathan Swift )

wiki: The name Looney Tunes (1930's) is a variation on Silly Symphonies, the name of Walt Disney's concurrent series of music-based cartoon shorts.

From Oxford Dictionaries:
'looney tunes (informal) adj crazy; deranged n. crazy or deranged people.

Origin: 1980s: from Looney Tunes, the name of an animated cartoon series that began in the 1930s, featuring Bugs Bunny and other characters
'

The term has undergone pejoration, as with Mickey Mouse, when it's not being used in reference to the cartoons characters.

Though the animations can be repeatedly played/ played repeatedly still, if their name was novel, it would be back to the drawing board.

Granada's Links: Stop Your Sobbing - Pretenders / The long way around - Dixie Chicks

Replied: 11th Nov 2012 at 09:18
Last edited by jo anne: 11th Nov 2012 at 09:22:04

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

'looney tunes (informal) adj crazy; deranged n. crazy or deranged people.

Interesting, Jo Anne.

I'd always assumed the 'tune' was slang for cartoon.

Replied: 11th Nov 2012 at 17:03

Posted by: 1934granada (inactive)

Thanks for the links Joanne. I appreciate that.

Replied: 12th Nov 2012 at 22:16
Last edited by 1934granada: 12th Nov 2012 at 22:16:41

Posted by: jo anne (33937) 

You're welcome, Granada.

Replied: 12th Nov 2012 at 22:26

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

November explanation:

BBC Green Book

Not to be confused with:

The Green Inkers

EDIT

Regardless of the colour of ink used, it is common to refer to correspondence of any kind (including email and webpages) as being in "green ink", so long as it broadly fits the following identifying characteristics:
- Stridency
- Impertinence
- Unreasonableness
- Unrealism
- Fancifulness
- Obsessiveness

Common comorbid characteristics include IRRELEVANT CAPITALISATION, overuse of exclamation marks!!!!!!!! and veiled threats or warnings directed at the recipient

Replied: 13th Nov 2012 at 20:50
Last edited by dostaf: 13th Nov 2012 at 20:56:26

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Replied: 14th Nov 2012 at 08:23

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Sir Terry Pratchett said, and I quote, "Five exclamation marks, the sure sign of an insane mind."

Replied: 14th Nov 2012 at 08:25

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

He knows nowt.

Replied: 14th Nov 2012 at 14:40

 

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