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Tackle Out

Started by: dostaf (inactive)

Tackle

I like that word.

But why are its uses, as a noun, so specific?

Off hand, I can only think of 'Fishing', together with 'Block and'.


Also a rude mention in Blackadder.

Started: 28th Dec 2012 at 15:32

Posted by: erontquay (inactive)

Some folk wont like to post about their "tackle" be it fishing or otherwise

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 15:36

Posted by: veg grower (inactive)

I was going to say tickle tackle - but it's tittle tattle.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 15:41

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

It's soon started.

I try to bring a bit of culture.

Still trying to remember the Blackadder scene. Thread title was said.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 15:46

Posted by: kryten (inactive)

I know one or two blokes who would tackle out.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 15:51

Posted by: veg grower (inactive)

'Thinking Tackle'?

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 15:51

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

George: Just about sir, yes. Erm, if you just like to pop your
clothes on the stool.

Blackadder: I'm sorry?

George: Just pop your clothes on the stool over there.

Blackadder: You mean, you want me... tackle out?

George: Well, I would prefer so sir, yes.

Blackadder: If I can remind you of the realities of battle George, one
of the first things that everyone notices is that all the
protagonists have got their clothes on. Neither we, nor
the Hun, favour fighting our battles "au naturel".



'Captain Cook' (BA Goes Fourth)

George was about to do a painting.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 15:53

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Have a go at an assailant....or ...Meat and three veg....

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 15:57

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

'Have a go at an assailant'

And that's why I went to all that trouble of mentioning 'noun'.

The lord only knows what The Urban Dictionary will have to offer.

Not checked, yet.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 16:00

Posted by: Mac (inactive)


To knock someone down by force. You run at them and fall into them. Happens a lot in football/Rugby

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 16:05

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

That is not a noun.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 16:17

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

nitpicking....Tackle in it's variant forms is allowed, specifics in your opening gambit do NOT disbar the verb

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 16:20

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

If it's a verb you want, the UD has this little gem:


1.

Tackling







(Verb) Important Military tactic. To run or swiftly walk behind an unsuspecting person without being seen, grab them by the waist tighty, strongly trust them (shouting "(Comment removed because it broke the rules)!" is optional) and make a quick get-away.Make sure a hiding spot is decided beforehand if necessary.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 16:21

Posted by: bentlegs (4619)

My grandad used to say after a meal, Annie love, That wuz Tackle,

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 20:51

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



I'm sure I've heard it said similarly.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 21:01

Posted by: lizziedownunder (7069) 

Oooooooo...... Don't know how to tackle this one!!!!
If I tackle it that way it may be rude......
If I tackle it this way, it will probably be downright boring
Whichever way I tackle the tackle...... Make your own mind up.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 23:53

Posted by: staffbullterrier (2224)

not had my tackle out for a couple of weeks now

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 09:45

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Blame the weather.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 14:21

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Can't 'tackle' mean clothes, too?

Blackadder would have had a shock if George had told him to take his tackle off.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 14:25

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Maybe he could have with the right tackle (equipment).

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 14:34

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Look what this tourist uncovers in Japan.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 14:39

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I'd like to see what else google sent you during that search, Jo Anne.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 14:50

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Lots of links about fishing & sports' tackles, I think. I just risked the YouTube link.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 14:54

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

There's a thought.

Nakky wrestling.

In mud.

I'll have a look.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 14:56

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

We ought to keep WW clean! Look at this clobber.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 15:12
Last edited by jo anne: 29th Dec 2012 at 15:14:44

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Thwaaarted.

Google don't seem to understand 'nakky'.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 15:24

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Google tackles it on WW.

Throw enough mud and some of it sticks.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 15:35

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Wonder if the phrase 'stick in the mud' does actually refer to an actual stick.

Or stick as in stay?

Clarts is a good word for mud.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 15:38
Last edited by dostaf: 29th Dec 2012 at 15:39:23

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

clarts n
Scot and Northern English dialect lumps of mud, esp on shoes
[of unknown origin]

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 15:42

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



Used frequently by Mr Barker in Porridge. Often preceded by 'dropped in the'.

Usually as a polite way of saying in the .........................

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 15:55

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Muck ... Mucking out ... I thought I was on the wrong tack with riding tackle, but that's what riding tack is short for after all.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 16:01

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

From a Wigan point of view, I always think of Miry Lane when I hear it.

Miry as in muddy.

And 'in it', as in the Corporation Muck Yard, which was down there.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 16:01

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

'Miry as in muddy' - It's been the more, the mirier recently.

'Corporation Muck Yard' would certainly be the mucky end of the stink.

(I don't know that area well, just know a little about it from WW)

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 16:15

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Been mentioned on here, as you say, Jo Anne.

Always wondered just how 'miry' the place was to earn that name.

There's a written account somewhere from a few centuries ago where a traveller complained about Wigan being little more than muddy tracks which were almost impassable.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 16:19

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Tacklers worked in t'mills.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 19:20

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

I'm vaguely aware of an account like that, but can't recall whose it was. It's not Celia Fiennes?

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 19:21

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

That's the one, Jo Anne.

It was told to us at school (shortly after she wrote it).

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 19:32

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

I think this fellow may have written about you when you were a little older - latter part of the 18th Century. (Guess)

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 19:39

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



Just been on about a comedic reference to 'benefit of clergy' with Joseph.

I wonder if that particular clergy (man) had the benefit of one of Tonker's ancestors with his geographical references.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 19:43

Posted by: bentlegs (4619)

Another one i forgot to post, when sitting down to a meal,the wife will shout from the kitchen,"will someone put the drilling tackle out" meaning knifes & forks,

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 21:44

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Never heard that one, Bentlegs.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 21:50

Posted by: erontquay (inactive)

Ha ha good one bentlegs.

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 21:50

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Replied: 29th Dec 2012 at 21:56

Posted by: lizziedownunder (7069) 

My mother in law being from Aberdeen used to say.....
"your shoes are clarted in mud.....take them off before you walk on my
Clean carpet"

Yes mother!!!

Replied: 30th Dec 2012 at 07:55

 

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