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Thinking Aloud

Started by: dostaf (inactive)

Trying to get me yed round a proper sort of term for the type of people who, as kids, were the boss amongst their playmates, or rather, thought they were.

you know the type. Didn't mix with kids their own age, but were with younger ones, such as friends of their younger siblings.

Not always by choice, I must add. Could be cases where there were no kids of same age to play with.

Anyroad, due to their age and size, they'd be looked up to and the other kids would take their words as being right.

Kathy in 'Whistle Down The Wind' comes to mind.

Not really bullies, but I wonder if in later life their childhoods leave them with an 'I know best. I'm always right' attitude?



Answers on a postcard to the usual address.

Started: 25th Dec 2012 at 18:53

Posted by: lizziedownunder (7069) 

Yes dostaf can see where you are coming from.......
My all time favourite black and white movie with Hayley Mills......
The little boy.... melted my heart....
The theme music is so haunting......

Replied: 25th Dec 2012 at 19:30

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Deliberat choice of music, Lizzie.

The strains of 'We three kings' can be discerned in the score as Kathy, her brother and sister march with the food 'gifts' they have acquired for the man in the 'stable'

From here

Trying to think of a similar example of a lad being the older bossy kid.

Replied: 25th Dec 2012 at 19:40

Posted by: bassman (3591)

That's the term you were looking for D......"bossy"...

Replied: 25th Dec 2012 at 22:12

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Aye. bossy.

But at the same time thinking they are more right than anyone else.

Replied: 25th Dec 2012 at 22:19

Posted by: lizziedownunder (7069) 

I can't think that I ever was a bossy person......may be a little too helpful...at times when it was not really wanted.....
Quite a few times I've been told to mind my own business by my aduld children which is fair enough......
The thing is when you know I am right and end up sorting it all out ......
It gets me a little peed off........

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 05:50

Posted by: ayrefield (4465)

They become the type of person that when the 5hit hits the fan they're experts at blaming it on subordinates.

Aye that's them, think they know it all, but know nought.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 13:10
Last edited by ayrefield: 26th Dec 2012 at 13:15:04

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I tried again to find a clip of that 'Proper Little Madam' bossy eldest sister on the Clarks shoes advert from years ago.

No joy.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 15:04

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Can you download this one?

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 15:19

Posted by: ayrefield (4465)

ooer get her, a proper little madam.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 15:29

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Yes!

That's the sort of thing.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 15:32

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Glad it's the right one - I can't download it to see at the moment.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 16:22

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Works fine for me.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 16:23

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Isn't bossiness about nature as well as nurture?

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 16:54

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Probably

Violet Elizabeth Bott (Just William)

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 16:59

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Bonnie Langford? was a great lead actress. If it had been 'Just William' then the story wouldn't have got very far.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 17:09

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I'm still trying to think of a male equivalent of a bossy little madam on the telly.

Not much joy.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 17:11

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Is this what you're thinking about, generally, Dostaf?


The Lord of the Flies (wikipedia):

"At an allegorical level, the central theme is the conflicting impulses toward civilization – live by rules, peacefully and in harmony – and towards the will to power. Themes include the tension between groupthink and individuality, between rational and emotional reactions, and between morality and immorality. How these play out, and how different people feel the influences of these, form a major subtext of Lord of the Flies."

I couldn't have put it better myself!

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 17:41

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

To put it technically, I mean them sods what think they know best about anything and everything. Despite being amongst wiser and more experienced people.

I'm always reminded of a right little madam who lived locally, always bossing younger kids about in the street.

Never saw her amongst kids her own size and age.

Makes me wonder if they then have an exaggerated sense of self-importance and go on similarly thinking they can get away with it in adulthood.

Don't know what ever became of the local kid I mentioned.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 17:49

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

"Makes me wonder if they then have an exaggerated sense of self-importance and go on similarly thinking they can get away with it in adulthood."

Put simply - do they have/develop a persisting superiority complex? I don't think it will automatically follow.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 18:19

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



From the male perspective, I think a more common similar example is one of the bloke who is, or would be master of his own home.

His word is sacrosanct, downtrodden wife/partner and kids who know no better.

They get a false sense of knowing knowledge , as nobody at home will argue.

Then when you meet them in the outside world, they spout drivel with great authority.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 18:24
Last edited by dostaf: 26th Dec 2012 at 18:35:00

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

^^^^

That's in no way meant to make light of some of the nasty bullies out there, who control and manipulate thier families.

I'm referring to the dafties in general.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 18:36

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

I know what you mean.

I think anthropology is a very interesting subject, except I can be subject to it, too. Then thinking is not allowed.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 18:54
Last edited by jo anne: 26th Dec 2012 at 19:02:46

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

One of the experts in knowing knowledge was Tony Hancock, or rather the eponymous character he created.

Just been having a look for some descriptions and found these pearls:

You want a misunderstood, self-proclaimed genius whose lofty ambitions in life are thwarted either by a boorish sidekick or, more often than not, his own painful shortcomings? A man trapped by circumstance? A, let's face it, pompous prig? Tony Hancock is the archetype.


And


Very much the man-on-the-street foil to his own pompous character, it was little wonder viewers were often rooting for the sidekick during their various confrontations.


Here

I don't know the backstory to the character. so can only guess as to how he supposedly became that way.

Makes for brilliant comedy, but these types can be a real pain in real life.

One formerly down the road used to be a right one. I just nod and let them get on with it. Trouble is, they're too daft/arrogant to see how stupid they appear.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 19:06
Last edited by dostaf: 26th Dec 2012 at 19:38:36

Posted by: sir bob (7084)

I bet your best mate on here was one if those who you describe dostaf

I think the word you are looking for could possibly be 'Big Head' or even 'Know All' but I think it comes down to a personal choice

Another way of putting it, is to say that the people/kids you describe dostaf, 'Lord' it over other people .....


Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 19:07

Posted by: sir bob (7084)

'Over Bearing' is another one

A big headed, over bearing, never wrong, know it all

Whoo could that be

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 19:13

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

'Trouble is, they're too daft/arrogant to ee how stupid they appear.' You missed an S, Dostaf.

There are often different perspectives in a situation, but people can't/won't always consider them all.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 19:34

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Absolutely, Jo Anne. Whether or not, as you mentioned, due to nature or nurture.

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 19:39

Posted by: bassman (3591)

Bossy= overbearing, domineering and authortarian.....now you can sleep tonight D....

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 23:23

Posted by: lizziedownunder (7069) 

My Dad always had my Mum under control..........

Oooooo..... Heavy stuff, can't go there........

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 23:47

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Sorry to hear that, Lizzie.

I certainly don't mean to make light of the more nastier issues along this theme.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 15:10

Posted by: walshy76 (inactive)


by: sir bob (454)
'Over Bearing' is another one

A big headed, over bearing, never wrong, know it all

Whoo could that be

Replied: 26th Dec 2012 at 19:13


could be a few people on here that, sb, or one person with a number of different names

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 15:13

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)



Onslow was a reluctant 'boss'.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 15:36

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Onslow and Daisy live in a run-down council house with Daisy's promiscuous sister Rose, and the sisters' senile father, called "Daddy". Onslow owns a dog, who lives outside in the rusting carcass of a Hillman Avenger in the front garden, and who barks at Hyacinth whenever she visits, causing her to fall into the bushes.

Keeping Up Appearances

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 15:39

Posted by: walshy76 (inactive)

i didnt no that

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 15:46

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 15:53

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

We gave up on watching The Royale Family on Christmas Day - it was a bit bleak.

I think it's difficult living together, no matter the mix of characters, at times. Some good points, too, hopefully, for most who do. As with living alone.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:09

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Wasn't impressed myself, Jo Anne.

A far cry from previous specials. Didn't care for the new neighbour character and the descent into crudity.

I'm obviously no prude, but they sank a bit with that one.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:17

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

It lost its subtlety - which is why I thought it worked often in the past.

We liked Miranda though. A bit less realism.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:21

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Yes.

I love that knockabout stuff she and Stevie do.

I was about to comment about Miranda on my Scout badge ponderings.

then I remembered it wasn't Miranda that had joined th Scoouts, but her alter ego 'Chummy' in the midwife programme.

And she plays a blinder in that, too.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:24

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Yesterday's Miranda is still making me laugh - written solely by Miranda, with a script editor, according to the credits.

Phew! I've caught up on Christmas Day's Call the Midwife today - quite hard-hitting sometimes, but well done. I like Chummy - all the cast for that matter.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:31

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I won't mention Pam Ferris's bedside manner with the old lady.

Lovely bit of comedy amongst tragedy.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:33

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Just had a google to see where I recognised the old lady from.

Sheila Reid

Plays the gran in Benidorm.

Only seen the first series of that. And nearly gave up on it as I did.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:39
Last edited by dostaf: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:04:32

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

I looked into getting the books for my Mum, but some reviewers felt they'd been written poorly & with condescension (scent-shun). That never seems to come across in the TV series though.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:43

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

Sheila's a great actress. We've seen a lot of the Benidorm episodes, often for the first time as repeats. Sometimes they're ok/ok-ish, and, occasionally, exceptional. One of the first episodes I saw was when the Gran's husband died unexpectedly (the actor had recently died in real life). That was brilliantly done, very moving.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:50

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I also like the special effects. Like this ship.

I noticed on the Chrisstmas one that there were several background views of modern (concrete) buildings under construction, complete with cranes.

Not 100% convincing, but gave a flavour of the time the piece was set.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:51

Posted by: kryten (inactive)

^^^^^^^^^
"Just had a google to see where I recognised the old lay from."


Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:54

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

I hadn't noticed that, Kryten!

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:55

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Off the telly. Off the telly.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 16:57

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

What a difference a D makes!

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:00

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Bugger, I missed it too.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:03

Posted by: kryten (inactive)

Twice

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:04

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

It's bad enough beiing plagued by owd Rebecca and Legs Akimbo.

I draw the line somewhere.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:06

Posted by: kryten (inactive)

Rebecca and Legs Akimbo? All done up like a ogs inner.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:12

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

DD would get them more attention.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:13

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I'd need more than Double Diamond, Jo anne.

It works wonders, aparrently.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:15

Posted by: kryten (inactive)

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:17

Posted by: jo anne (33512) 

I was thinking of different cups.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, if someone happens to be older, so what?

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:18

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

I know nowt about Russians.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:18

Posted by: kryten (inactive)

If beauty is skin deep owd legs akimbo is inside out.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:20

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

Probably a lot better looking in the flesh.

Some of them pics are fricknin.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 17:24

Posted by: lizziedownunder (7069) 

Thankyou dostaf.....

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 18:56

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

You're most welcome, Lizzie.

Replied: 27th Dec 2012 at 19:18

Posted by: lizziedownunder (7069) 

What happens??
In most cases the subservient partner realises that their spirit is being crushed and what happens next the ones with the courage fly the coop and go and find what they had there in the first place...... Their own self worth.....
In my eyes this is a good thing......

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 00:06

Posted by: billy (26053) 

on a clear dayyyyy
rise and look around you
and the glow of your being, outshines every starrrrr.
yeah.....thats me and it bothers me none who disagrees.
HAPPPPPYYYYY NEWWW YEARRRR EVERYONE IN W-W.hic-hic

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 01:59

Posted by: lizziedownunder (7069) 

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU AND YOURS BILLY!!!!!!!
May your star always twinkle!!!!!! . xx

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 02:26

Posted by: billy (26053) 

ditto to you liz.....you and sydlass ought to get together and sink a few jim beams

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 10:04

Posted by: lizziedownunder (7069) 

Gave up on the alcohol a long time ago billy.......
It was too hard to keep climbing out of the bottom of the pit.....

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 10:33

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Is that pic of ounslow descriptive of boobs, Dostaf....If it isn't, you are VERY perceptive.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 11:03

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

ounslow

It's ONSLOW, dear boy, ONSLOW.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 13:40

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Fat scruffy food stained vest wearing layabout that he is.....Then there is ONSLOW!

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 15:40

Posted by: dostaf (inactive)

One way of getting out of it.

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 15:47

Posted by: Mac (inactive)

Replied: 28th Dec 2012 at 15:58

 

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