Photos of Wigan
Photos of Wigan



Photo-a-Day Archive
Photo-a-Day Archive

Photo-a-Day  (Friday, 23rd August, 2013)

Bulrushes


Bulrushes
Windy Arbour.

Photo: Roger Whistlecroft  (Nikon Coolpix S6200)
Views: 3,442

Comment by: Lizzie down under on 23rd August 2013 at 00:49

A beautiful picture Roger....the rushes are lovely....do you know what the pinky purple flowers are.....they are really pretty....cheers!!!

Comment by: joe graney on 23rd August 2013 at 07:01

Windy Harbour thats name brings back memories,lads I worked with in the mines use to mention the pit there.

Comment by: Rev David Long on 23rd August 2013 at 07:34

They're reedmace - not bullrushes.
Nice pic, though.

Comment by: Anne on 23rd August 2013 at 08:05

How many people say Windy harbour. It is Windy ARBOUR as the caption says, no H.

Comment by: kath Pressey on 23rd August 2013 at 08:54

I always call them bulrushes too. it's a very pretty photo.

Comment by: Dave B on 23rd August 2013 at 08:58

Nice picture with a splash of natural
colour

Comment by: Janice on 23rd August 2013 at 10:02

Nice photograph Roger. I don't know this place as not a Wiganer. Do you know how it got it's name as an Arbour is a shady garden alcove with the sides and roof formed by trees or climbing plants trained over a framework? Just curious.

Comment by: Cyril on 23rd August 2013 at 10:34

The flowers are Willowherb Lizzie.

Comment by: Maureen on 23rd August 2013 at 10:49

That's a very peaceful picture..lovely,pleasing to the eye.

Comment by: Lizzie down under on 23rd August 2013 at 12:17

Thank you Cyril.....they are a colour I like....agree with you Maureen.....very peaceful....cheers!!!

Comment by: britboy on 23rd August 2013 at 13:34

Bulrush is the common name for this wetland species

Comment by: Garry on 23rd August 2013 at 15:19

The common name we all know is bullrushes, final answer.

Comment by: Rev David Long on 23rd August 2013 at 17:18

It isn't the 'common name' - it's simply an all-too-common-mistake, which is rather different.

Comment by: Garry on 23rd August 2013 at 18:42

Sorry Rev, but here in Wigan..(and I'v been round the block) it's known as Bullrush. Ask any true Wiganer.

Comment by: Rev David Long on 23rd August 2013 at 19:42

Being a Wiganer doesn't make you immune from being wrong.
Not that it's a Wigan thing to misname this plant - it's pretty universal - probably because some silly Victorian artist drew 'Moses in the bullrushes' surrounded by reedmace, rather than bulrushes.
Okay - it LOOKS as if it ought to be called a bul(l)rush, because it looks 'macho' - but it fits its real name of reed mace (that's something you clobber people with) even better.

Comment by: steve on 23rd August 2013 at 19:48

The correct term is Typha(Reedmace)the Bullrush of the country pond. Dont argue with the Rev he is infallible!

Comment by: Garry on 23rd August 2013 at 20:11

We Wiganers have always known this plant as a Bullrush...so Bullrush it is. What do Liverpudlions call sandwiches...they call them sarnes. It all depends where your from, ie town/city, it's been taken in Wigan so it's a Bullrush.

Comment by: john on 23rd August 2013 at 20:22

Willowherb and Bullrushes what a nice combination

Comment by: Lizzie down under on 23rd August 2013 at 20:24

Wikipedia states that in the northern hemisphere they are known as Bulrushes or Reedmace......just my observations....cheers!!!!

Comment by: alan lad on 23rd August 2013 at 20:36

Say Bullrush and folk will know what is being talked about .

Comment by: Rev David Long on 23rd August 2013 at 21:09

Ignorance is bliss!
Lizzie - they may be 'known' as bulrushes, but that arises from ignorance. They remain reedmace, just as a rabbit is a rabbit and a hare is a hare, no matter how confused folk get in recognising the difference.
Alan - only because they've fallen into a common trap.
And it's obviously not just a Wigan thing, Garry.
Even if 99% of people think black is white, it doesn't mean they're right.

Comment by: Roger on 23rd August 2013 at 22:07

Whatever the name I just thought it would be a good subject, when I was a child bullrushes were common due to the pit flashes but now you don't see many. As children we used to dry them and then soak them in paraffin and light them, run around the street, rather like a primitive Star Wars light saber

Comment by: Jean F (Wales) on 23rd August 2013 at 22:15

Must get my penny worth in......They are known to us as Bullrushes !
Gary...as well as sarnies the liverpudlians call our "stew"..scouse.....hence the name "scousers"if I am wrong no doubt my "scouse" friend will tell me .(and everyone else !)

Comment by: britboy on 24th August 2013 at 00:24

Take your pick....

[url="http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typha"]whatever takes your fancy"[/url]

Comment by: daveĀ© on 24th August 2013 at 01:09

Type "Typha" into Wikipedia.

Bulrushes=Reedmace.

Comment by: Ellen on 24th August 2013 at 03:19

I didn't mean to get into this, but must finally get my oar in; only to say that they are known as Bulrushes in the small corner of the world known as mid-Western Ontario. My daughter went to the local swamp and brought some back to plant beside the pond she made for me this year, in our garden.

Comment by: Harry C. on 24th August 2013 at 08:51

Give it a rest, it's a photo!

Comment by: Norman P on 24th August 2013 at 11:43

I shall continue to call them Bullrushes

Comment by: Rev David Long on 24th August 2013 at 19:04

Well, at least no one can say I let you wallow in your ignorance!

Comment by: Garry on 24th August 2013 at 19:21

And Bull...rush to you Rev, and thanks for the natter.

Comment by: Art on 25th August 2013 at 01:11

Rev...A rabbit is a "Conie"..;o)

Comment by: Steve on 25th August 2013 at 14:46

What ever you want to call them they have certainly given them something to talk about on the "gerneral" section!!!!

Comment by: Wiginer through and through. on 29th August 2013 at 08:20

Dear Rev Long, the vicar from Chorley tells me they are known as "bullrushes".and the Charlie Chaplin cannotbe wrong.

Comment by: twitter on 30th August 2013 at 12:14

in wian we call a moggie a mouse , but in scouse land a moggie is a cat.

Comment by: Chuck Turner on 7th September 2013 at 02:54

In other parts of the English speaking world they are known as " cat-tails "

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