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Old news detailing sports, crime, violence and suffering in Victorian Wigan. All stories taken from The Wigan Observer And District Advertiser, 1890. Material kindly loaned by Ron Hunt.


Wednesday, July 2, 1890.

JUMPING
PARTINGTON AND MILLER FOR 50.

   The long-pending jumping match between William Partington (alias "Wilty"), of Ashton-in-Makerfield, and John Miller, of Platt Bridge, was brought to a most satisfactory issue on Saturday last, at the Pagefield Grounds, Wigan, before about 400 spectators. They had signed articles to contest six stand hops and a jump, on level terms, for a stake of 50. Both underwent a capital preparation, but unfortunately the weather on Saturday was of the vilest description, rain falling in torrents nearly all the afternoon, which made the track in a very sloppy condition. Some brisk betting was indulged in at the start, evens being freely laid and taken, but eventually 60 to 40 was laid on Partington. Miller was the first to lead off, and covered about 23 yards. On Partington going on he beat this mark rather easily by a yard. After a brief rest Miller went on again, but was about 2ft 2in. behind. Nothing daunted he went on again, but after a magnificent attempt, he just failed to get up by about half an inch. Partington thus won somewhat readily. The match was a most pleasant one all through, whilst the crowd was the most orderly one ever seen at these grounds. Partington, who is as well known as a sprinter as he is a jumper, was trained by S. Webb, of Stubshaw Cross. The editor of the Sporting Chronicle was stakeholder, while Mr. J. Howe, of the same paper, was referee, he being assisted at the starting point by J. Keene, of Newton-le-Willows.



Wednesday, July 2, 1890.

KILLED ON THE LINE
A TIMEKEEPER'S DEATH

   On Monday, Mr. L. R. Rowbottom, borough coroner, held an inquest at the Infirmary on the body of a young man named Charles Yates, of Hindley. The deceased who was employed by the London and North-Western Railway Company as a timekeeper, was knocked down and fatally injured by a light engine between Bamfurlong and Springs Branch.
   Peter Yates, 99, Chapel Green, Hindley, police-sergeant in the county constabulary, said deceased was his son, and lived with him. He was a timekeeper in the employment of the London and North-Western Railway Company, and had just turned 21 years of age. Witness was present at the death of his son in the Infirmary, but the latter was unconscious and did not speak to him.
   James Gore, Preston-street, Lower Ince, said he was a stoker on the London and North-Western Railway. On Saturday witness was on a light engine going from Amberswood West Junction to Bamfurlong. John Gaskell was the engine driver. Deceased's duty as a timekeeper took him up and down the line on foot. The accident occurred about halfway between Bamfurlong and Springs Branch, and the engine was on the up-line. A ballast train was on the siding. About ten o'clock in the morning witness saw the deceased about twenty yards off, standing between the main line and the ballast train and near to the latter. Both witness and the driver were looking ahead, and the deceased was standing with his face to the ballast train. Witness's attention was then called for a moment to the injector, and when he looked out again he saw a man's hat fly up in front of the engine and felt that they had run over something. Witness immediately applied the brake and Gaskell turned off steam, and the engine was stopped. They then saw deceased lying in the four foot, the engine having run right over him.
   John Gaskell, the engine-driver, living at 448, Spring View, Lower Ince, said he was on the look out at the time of the accident. The speed of the engine was about ten to twelve miles an hour. Witness never saw anything of the deceased until he was run over. His idea was that he suddenly left the ballast train and went in front of their engine. Deceased was picked up as soon as possible and taken by the ballast engine in the brake van to the Infirmary.
   Dr. Lea, one of the house surgeons at the Infirmary, said deceased was admitted about half-past ten on Saturday, suffering from fracture of the skull, injury to the brain, crushed foot and crushed arm. It was a hopeless case, and he died about half-past two. He was brought in an ambulance in a proper manner.
   A verdict of "Accidental death" was returned.



Friday, July 4, 1890.

A POKER IN COURT.
   Ellen Walsh and Alice Walsh, of 18, Warrington-lane, mother and daughter, were summoned for using threatening language in the street. The latter defendant appeared with a poker concealed under her shawl. - Police-constable Ryan proved that the two females were falling out with some persons who lived close by. - Mr. Ellis asked what was the meaning of the poker. - Alice Walsh thereupon stated that it was the poker used by the neighbours who were quarrelling with them. She herself was knocked down and hit in the eye. - Each defendant had to pay costs.



Friday, July 4, 1890.

A CURE FOR BRONCHITIS.
   Anne Dillon, of Lowe's-square, in reply to a charge of being drunk and disorderly, said she had the bronchitis and took a drop of whiskey for the purpose of curing herself. - Both Police-constables Lewtas and Smythe stated that she was drunk and cursing and swearing and creating a great disturbance, and the magistrates fined her 10s. and costs, in default 14 days' imprisonment.



Friday, July 4, 1890.

OPINIONS DIFFER.
   Mary Ann Ryan, of Caldwell's-yard, was summoned for assaulting Bridget Burke, Hardybutts. - The latter said shortly after eleven on Saturday night, she was going home and went into a shop, leaving her daughter and the defendant outside. She heard them quarrelling, and Ryan was casting some aspersions on her daughter's character, and they came to blows. Witness, at once went outside and attempted to separate them. The defendant then hit her twice on the head with her clog, and gave her a blow with a hammer, leaving her "dateless" for a long time. - The defendant vehemently denied the offence, and behaved in such a disorderly manner in court as might lead one to question her sobriety. She shouted out that she was really the assaulted party, and that the magistrates judgement (they fined her 10s. and costs) was an unjust one. She was so persistent in her remarks that she was taken down below by order of the magistrates.



Saturday, July 5, 1890.

ACCIDENT IN THE MINE AT
ASHTON.

   Mr. W. T. Husband, deputy county coroner, held an inquest at the Star Hotel, Bryn, on Saturday, concerning the death of Wm. Winnard, 44 years of age, of Tootill-street, Ashton. The deceased worked in the No. 5 pit of the Garswood Hall Collieries. On Monday week his son was returning from the shunt with an empty box when he heard the sound of something falling. He immediately ran to his parent's working place, and found to his dismay that about 4 cwt. of coal had fallen on to the deceased. Help was procured, and the man was liberated and taken home. Dr. Latham attended him until his death, which occurred on Thursday. - After hearing the evidence the jury agreed that the death was accidental, and returned a verdict to that effect.



Saturday, July 5, 1890.

ASSAULT ON A WIFE.
   The case of Berry v. Berry came on for hearing, in which the wife summoned her husband for assault on the 9th ult. - Mr. Wilson appeared for the complainant, and Mr. Lees for the defendant. From the evidence it seemed that the defendant went to his home at Pemberton, and had a few words with his wife. He kicked her on the lower part of her body, and inflicted such injuries that she had to be under the care of Dr. Berry for about ten days. - A fine of 40s. and costs was imposed.



Saturday, July 5, 1890.

A GREAT STIR IN ASHTON.
   Thomas Talbot, of Ashton-in-Makerfield, was charged with being drunk and disorderly at Ashton, assaulting the police, and breaking nine squares of glass in the cell windows of the Ashton Police Station. - Police-constable Bannister said about a quarter to nine, on Saturday night, the prisoner was drunk in Gerard-street. He was wanting to fight, and witness requested him to go away several times. He refused to give his name, and when he attempted to take him into custody he became very violent. He kicked witness on the arms and legs, and the large crowd that had gathered round caused witness to be taken off his legs several times. Prisoner threw his whistle away from him, and then several men came to witness's assistance, but were prevented by the crowd from rendering any aid. With the assistance of Sergeant Williams they got prisoner to the police-station. - In answer to Mr. Superintendent Brassington, witness stated that there were from a thousand to fifteen hundred persons present. In trying to assist witness one shopkeeper was assaulted. Before the prisoner was put in the cell the windows were all complete. About a quarter of an hour afterwards nine panes were broken, and blood was found on the prisoner's hands. Witness had only been stationed in Ashton a week. - Sergeant Williams deposed that he found the prisoner and the officer struggling together. The former was very violent, kicking, and striking, and he saw him kick the constable several times on the legs. Shortly after the prisoner was locked up, witness heard a noise in the cells, and on going there found the man engaged in breaking the windows with his fist. - Prisoner was ordered to pay the damage, and was sent to gaol for fourteen days for the assault.



Saturday, July 5, 1890.

A COLLIER FINED.
   Henry Lisle, a collier, working in the No. 4 Pit of the 6ft. mine of the Bamfurlong Colliery, was fined 5s. and costs for being found with a tobacco pipe in his possession down the mine. - Mr T. Cowburn (Messrs. Darlington and Sons) prosecuted on behalf of Messrs. Cross, Tetley, and Company.


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